Tags: News

Some Thoughts on User Awareness Training

Brian Krebs published an article about a tech firm losing $46 million in a technology-based heist.  The heist used forged communications from senior executives to complete financial transactions.  This got me thinking about user awareness training and how we’re doing it and how we might do it better.

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Thoughts on Fiat Chrysler’s Patching Dilemma

Hi, my name is Aaron and I’m an INFOSEC hipster.  I was worried about the security of our increasingly connected cars back in 2013, which is way before it was cool to be worried about such things.  Someone fetch me some thick, black framed glasses and a PBR while I configure my retro NFR IDS.  […]

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UPDATED: A Quick Rant on the Wassenaar Arrangement

UPDATE: The U.S. government has decided to scrap the initial version of the Wassenaar Arrangement.  The decision to do so was driven by the negative feedback from many of its stakeholders.  This is a great example of the system working and common sense prevailing.  I’d like to see this happen more often. I’m going to […]

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The Week that Was – 10/28/2013

Last week had a number of interesting developments.  Two of them involved the law, privacy, and security implications. First, the Third Circuit Court ruled that GPS tracking devices attached to vehicles require a probable cause warrant. [9]   I think this is an important ruling for privacy and the 4th Amendment.  I’m a proponent for […]

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The Week That Was – 4/22/2013

Hey everybody, thanks for coming back this week.  I’ve got a couple of interesting articles to cover this week.  Highlights include the ACLU v. Google, CISPA, IAM, vendor management, and batteries.

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The Week that Was – 2013.04.01

I was on vacation last week so the news this week is a bit stale, but there are still some good items in here.  For instance: A federal judge found National Security Letters (NSL) unconstitutional.  [7]  It appears the numbers of NSLs have been decreasing over the years, but violations of the Constitution are never […]

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The Week That Was – 2013-03-19

We have some good ones this week. Andrew Hay and Ray Umerley have some interesting points about brining up the next generation of information security professionals.  [2], [9]  As a profession we tend to focus on the technical aspect of the problem and encourage folks to specialize in one particular area of the profession.  We […]

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The Risk of Mass Shootings

The shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary last week were horrific.  There is no denying that fact.  Twenty-eight innocent people were murdered.  If that weren’t shocking enough, most of them were children.  This event and its aftermath are emotionally charged.  While we need to honor and respect that emotion, we also need to understand that it […]

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The Week That Was – 11/26/2012

Here’s the week that was.  As always, we have a little bit of everything from encrypted messages from secret societies [18] to Chinese aircraft carriers [9]. The story about the encrypted messages from the Great Enlightened Society of Oculists was my favorite.  [18]  It’s a great overlap of history and technology.  And the technology used […]

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The Week That Was – 11/19/2012

Responsible adulthood sucks.  I’ve been up to my eyeballs in personal and professional work and the blog had to take a back seat.  I finally got it pushed up the priority list.  Here are the items I was able to come up with last week. The side channel attacks on virtual systems is interesting.  [2], […]

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